Tag Archives | William Morrow

Stardust | Neil Gaiman

The cover of Gaiman's StardustThe town of Wall has an eponymous stone wall to the East. There is only one six foot break in the wall that separates Wall, the city, from the realm of the fairy. For thousands of years the town had posted two guards at the entrance to prevent traffic between the two worlds. This arrangement worked well until a certain Tristran Thorn decided to chase a falling star.

Stardust is fairy-tale at its finest. Although first published in 1999, it feels like something far older—something George MacDonald might pen. The classic themes of love and adventure, mystery and sacrifice, are woven into a tale that will linger in the reader’s mind.

I read Stardust in one evening. It has that sort of compelling power. It’s the perfect companion for a candlelit evening when the power goes out and the world seems strange. Read it and you’ll never look at a shooting star the same way again!


Gaiman, Neil. Stardust. New York: William Morrow, 2016.

Seveneves | Neal Stephenson

The cover of Stephenson's Seveneves“Five Thousand Years Later” (569).

Stephenson is no stranger to epic stories. Consider his three volume, eight book, 3,000 word Baroque Trilogy! Still, how do you write a unified story that hinges on the words, “five thousand years later”? Stephenson accomplishes it with style.

He begins the story with these words:

The moon blew up without warning and for no apparent reason. (3)

The book tells the tale of what that explosion would entail and how humanity would respond in the ultimate survival situation.

Seveneves is a science-fiction book with a strong emphasis on science. Much of the sprawling page-count is devoted to explaining theoretical technology. Don’t let that dissuade you, though. Stephenson instructs in the context of the narrative without making the dialogue feeling forced or artificial.

This is simply the best science fiction book I have read in over a decade. (I don’t say that lightly either—I checked my archived reviews!) Seveneves is a page-turner with enough substance to hold the readers mind over many late nights.

—Neal Stephenson, Seveneves (New York: William Morrow, 2015).

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